SEC Rule 17f-2: Fingerprinting Of Securities Industry Personnel

SEC Rule 17f-2: Fingerprinting Of Securities Industry Personnel

Under SEC Rule 17F-2, every member of a national securities exchange, broker, dealer, registered transfer agent and registered clearing agency, and national securities association (as well as others), shall require that each of its partners, directors, officers, and employees be fingerprinted and submit appropriate and complete fingerprint cards to FINRA. FINRA then transmits these fingerprints and identifying information to the FBI to identify and process, consistent with protocols and requirements established by the Attorney General. Who is Required to be Fingerprinted? SEC Rule 17f-2 requires that the following associated persons be fingerprinted: Persons applying for registration. A fingerprint card must Read more about SEC Rule 17f-2: Fingerprinting Of Securities Industry Personnel[…]

Reporting And Inquiry for Lost, Counterfeit, Missing, and Stolen Securities

Reporting And Inquiry for Lost, Counterfeit, Missing, and Stolen Securities

SEC Rule 17f-1 calls for the SEC or its designee, currently the Securities Information Center (SIC), to maintain records of lost, counterfeit, missing, or stolen securities. This rule was created in an effort to reduce trafficking in lost, stolen, missing, and counterfeit securities. The database of securities maintained by the SIC can only be accessed by registered BDs and other financial institutions to ascertain if securities that have come into their possession have been reported as lost, stolen, missing, or counterfeit. No Criminal Action Suspected Upon discovery of the likely loss of a security, if no criminal action is suspected, Read more about Reporting And Inquiry for Lost, Counterfeit, Missing, and Stolen Securities[…]

Rule 147

Rule 147 Offerings

Rule 147, also known as the intrastate offering exemption, allows for firms to avoid registration with the SEC for intrastate offerings under certain conditions. This exemption seeks to facilitate the financing of local business operations for companies that are organized in the state where it is offering the securities, carry out a significant amount of its business in that state, and make offers and sales only to residents of that state. The Rule 147 exemption is available only if the entire issue is offered and sold exclusively to residents of that single state. If any sales take place to non-residents, Read more about Rule 147 Offerings[…]

Investment Adviser Marketing Rule

Investment Adviser Marketing Rule

Effective May 4, 2021, the SEC’s recently adopted amendment to rule 206(4)-1 of the Advisers Act went into effect.  The Advertising Rule, 206(4)-1, which addressed how advisers marketed their services to clients and investors, had not been updated with any substance since it was adopted in 1961.  The same is true for the “solicitation rule” adopted in 1979. The new investment adviser marketing rule amends the existing rule 206(4)-1, known as “the advertising rule,” and replaces rule 206(4)-3, the “solicitation rule.” The SEC believed it was appropriate to regulate both the investment adviser advertising and the solicitation activity of an adviser through a single rule: The Marketing Rule.

Read More…

Gifts and Gratuities

Gifts and Gratuities

Advisory representatives are prohibited from accepting anything of value that might influence their investment decisions or serve to reward them in connection with their investment advisory activities. Additionally, advisory representatives are expected to refrain from knowingly conducting advisory business with any individuals or entities that use gifts, gratuities, or other items of value to bribe or influence others.

The provision and receipt of gifts and business entertainment by investment advisers and their employees are subject to pervasive regulation. Firms are to supervise and document all gifts and gratuities given to or received from any clients and prospective clients. The rule protects against the improprieties that may arise when firms or their associated persons gives gifts or gratuities. Firms must take any action to identify or examine the nature, frequency, extent and dollar amount to determine if such gifts and/or gratuities are in compliance with the firm’s policies. RIA’s are to adopt a policy governing professional conduct and conflicts of interest. Such policy is to provide that all associated persons have high standards of performance, integrity, productivity and professionalism. The firm should monitor for any and all conflicts of interest that could result, including instances of preferential treatment over other clients.

Read More…

Schedule 13(d) and 13(g)

Schedule 13(d) and 13(g)

Sections 13(d) and 13(g) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 require certain market participants to file reports with the SEC. The reporting obligations under sections 13(d) and 13(g) generally focus on the concept of “beneficial ownership” and depend upon numerous factors, including the class and amount of securities acquired, and the purpose and intent with which the particular position is held. Generally, any person (including any entity) who is the “beneficial owner” of more than 5% of any class of equity securities, as defined in Rule 13d-1(i) of the Exchange Act, is subject to the beneficial ownership reporting requirements of section 13(d) of the Exchange Act.

Read More…